Four ways to make agile ceremonies more productive

Posted on May 6th, 2014 in Agile by siddharta || No Comment

​One of the common complaints about agile is that there are too many ceremonies. The issue isn’t with meetings per-se. The problem is that too many of the meetings are not as productive as they could be. Here are 4 ways to make the meeting more productive:

Keep the ceremony on track

A common cause for an ineffective meeting is that the conversation goes into tangential topics and the meeting outcome is never met. This leads to another meeting to be scheduled, or delays in the work. Here are some examples:

  1. ​In a grooming meeting, the conversation goes away from preparing upcoming stories. The PO and team instead start discussing the status of current stories. By the end of the meeting, none of the stories are groomed. When the next planning meeting came around many stories will not be in a position to be picked up.
  2. In a daily standup, the discussion goes towards solving one particular blocker. The whole team is standing and getting totally bored while two team members have a long discussion on the blocker.

In all these cases, keeping the ceremony on track would have saved everyone some valuable time. The next time you notice a discussion going on a tangent, put the discussion on the parking lot, or schedule another meeting specifically for that discussion. Then get back on track for the reason you have set up the meeting.

Reduce distractions

Be sure to run meetings without laptops and phones on silent. The biggest meeting killer is when someone is talking and meantime everyone else is checking email or doing something else. When folks are distracted, the meeting loses its purpose, and further discussions have to take place during the to go over the same ground that was covered in the meeting. When everyone is focused, the meeting can be finished earlier and everyone can get back to work.

Set aside certain slots for scheduling meetings

Software development requires a block of time to concentrate. Having a meeting in the middle can disrupt that time. It is better to have a 60 minute meeting followed by 4 hours of coding time, rather than 2 hours of coding time, then the meeting, followed by another 2 hours of time. Agile ceremonies happen on a regular schedule, so you can easily schedule them in the most convenient time. For example, some teams schedule all their ceremonies in the morning and keep the afternoons free of meetings. This is more productive than randomly having meetings throughout the day.

Ensure that the ceremony pre-requisites are met

A few days before the ceremony the Scrummaster or team should make a quick check that everything is ready. For instance, the stories should be well formed, and ready for discussion. If they are missing acceptance criteria or there are outstanding decisions to be taken, then the story should be de-prioritised from the discussion. Otherwise you will waste time in the ceremony going off track. Similarly, if some architecture review was identified in the grooming, then ensure it happens before the meeting.

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